Henrik Daae Zachrisson

Henrik Daae Zachrisson, Prof.

Prof. Henrik Daae Zachrisson is trained as a psychologist at the University of Aarhus, Denmark, and received his PhD at the Department of Psychology at UiO in 2009. He was a PhD fellow and later Post Doc fellow at the Norwegian Institute of Public Health. Previous research interests have been parent-child attachment and child mental health, eating disorders, and psychiatric epidemiology. His main methodological interests are causal modelling in observational data, measurement of change, and measurement models in early childhood. His main substantive research interests are Early Childhood Education and Care, social inequality in early education, and consequences of childhood poverty.

WORK PACKAGES: 1, 3, 6

EXTERNAL LINKS:
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CONTACT INFORMATION
Center for Educational Measurement at the University of Oslo (CEMO)
Oslo, Norway

Description

Petitclerc, A., Côté, S., Doyle, O., Burchinal, M., Herba, C., Zachrisson, H.D., Boivin, M., Tremblay, R.E., Tiemeier, H., Jaddoe, V., Raat, H. (In press). Who uses early childhood education and care services? Comparing socioeconomic selection across five western policy ontexts. International Journal of Child Care and Education Policy. 11:3.

Bøe, T., Hysing, M., & Zachrisson, H.D. (2016). Low family income and behavior problems: Are children differentially susceptible? Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Paediatrics,37, 213-22.

Zachrisson, H.D, & Dearing, E. (2015) Family income dynamics and early child behavior problems in Norway: Is center care a buffer? Child Development, 86:425-440.

Sibley, E., Dearing, E., Toppelberg, C.O., Mykletun, A., & Zachrisson, H.D. (2015). Does Increased Availability and Reduced Cost of Early Childhood Care and Education Narrow Social Inequality Gaps in Utilization? Evidence from Norway. International Journal of Child Care and Education Policy.9:1.

Zachrisson, H.D., Nærde, A., & Janson, H. (2013). Predicting early center care utilization in a context of universal access. Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 28: 74-82.